34 new cities enter the Google Fiber games vying for super fast Internet

Google asks could it be your city

February 20th, 2014, 11:03 am

Google is expanding its network of fiber and now a long list of new cities could soon be sucking down that sweet high-speed Internet nectar.

Google Fiber Map

On its Google Fiber blog, the search company announced it has invited 34 cities in nine metro areas around the United States to work with it on bringing Google Fiber to more locales.

The 34 cities in consideration include Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Tempe in Arizona; San Jose, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale, Mountain View, and Palo Alto in California; Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs, and Smyrna in Georgia; Nashville-Davidson in Tennessee; Charlotte, Carrboro, Cary, Chapel Hill, Durham, Garner, Morrisville, and Raleigh in North Carolina; Portland, Beaverton, Hillsboro, Gresham, Lake Oswego, and Tigard in Oregon; San Antonio in Texas; and Salt Lake City in Utah.

While the list is out, Google plans on bringing updates on just who will get its light speed connection by the end of the year. There no guarantee if each and every city will get the new service, so until then it will be working closely with municipalities to map out the fiber network in detail.

The real hope is Google would bring their delicious 10Gb broadband to all cities but as the company wrote, it worries that “it might not work out for everyone.” For now this new project will just be a learning experience for the chosen cities to build a fiber network with Google or any provider.

Thus far, Google’s small fiber network has only been limited to a few locations including Kansas City, Provo in Utah, and Austin, Texas. A Google spokesperson told TechRadar that these little fiber experiments have drawn in a lot of interest since 2010 when over 1,100 communities applied for the same service.

But in reality building new series of tubes takes months of planning and construction.

With this new initiative, the search company plans to learn from wide variety of different construction environments and challenges not limited to the area’s topography, housing density, and the local existing infrastructure.

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